Repenting of Religion

Repenting of Religion

Are you frustrated by a tendency to judge others? Pastor and award-winning author Greg Boyd asserts that God shares his unsurpassable worth with each of us, making the practice of judgment foreign to Christian character.

In Repenting of Religion, Boyd shows you how to begin practicing a religion of love rather than embracing judgmental doctrine based on our human perceptions of morality. He exposes lies we have believed about ourselves and others and demonstrates the freedom we have for establishing true biblical community.

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Seeing is Believing

Seeing is Believing

One of the most common problems with Christians in our modern secularized world is that they don’t feel the reality of Jesus. Sure, they believe in him and love him, but he somehow doesn’t seem to enter their daily lives in a real sense. Some might say, “You ought to pray more.” Others would advise, “You ought to witness more.” While this may be true, we don’t get closer to God just because we “ought to.”

Boyd believes that the way to true spiritual transformation and feeling the presence of God in your life comes from a little R and R: rest and reality. Boyd encourages readers to stop striving and learn to rest in an experience of Jesus as real. The best way to do this, he says, is through imaginative prayer. Experiencing Jesus will teach readers how to use God’s gracious gift of creative imagination to know him better and feel his presence in their daily lives.

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Is God to Blame?

Is God to Blame?

Author:
Genre: Apologetics

Is God to blame? This is often the question that comes to mind when we confront real suffering in our own lives or in the lives of those we love. Pastor Gregory A. Boyd helps us deal with this question honestly and biblically, while avoiding glib answers. Writing for ordinary Christians, Boyd wrestles with a variety of answers that have been offered by theologians and pastors in the past. He finds that a fully Christian approach must keep the person and work of Jesus Christ at the very center of what we say about human suffering and God’s place in it. Yet this is often just what is missing and what makes so much talk about the subject seem inadequate and at times even misleading. What comes through in Is God to Blame? is a hopeful picture of a sovereign God who is relentlessly opposed to evil, who knows our sufferings and who can be trusted to bring us through them to renewed life.

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Across the Spectrum

Across the Spectrum

Evangelical thinkers in recent years have thrust differing and sometimes nontraditional views on the doctrine of God, the composition of the human person, and the nature of hell into the spotlight.

Across the Spectrum, written by Bethel College theologians Gregory Boyd and Paul Eddy, offers a service to the church by carefully examining the various positions taken by evangelical scholars on eighteen seminal issues–both classic concerns and those of more contemporary interests. Rather than taking sides, however, the authors give readers the resources they need to make up their own minds.

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Satan and the Problem of Evil

Satan and the Problem of Evil

Where does evil come from? If there is a sovereign creator God, as Christian faith holds, is this God ultimately responsible for evil? Does God’s sovereignty mean that God causes each instance of sin and suffering? How do Satan, his demons and hell fit into God’s providential oversight of all creation and history? How does God interact with human intention and action? If people act freely, does God know in particular every human decision before the choice is made?

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God of the Possible

God of the Possible

This exceptionally engaging and biblically centered text defends a theological claim that is generating heated controversy among evangelicals: that from God’s perspective, the future is partly open, a realm of possibilities as well as certainties. Boyd, professor of theology at Bethel College (St. Paul, Minn.) and author of Letters from a Skeptic and God at War, displays a remarkable ability to make “open theism” accessible to a wide audience. Open theism usually receives a cool reception among evangelical theologians, whose views of divine foreknowledge often echo Augustine, Aquinas and Calvin, as well as Hellenistic philosophical theology. This classical tradition interprets God’s perfection as eternal changelessness, ruling out the possibility that God could learn new information, or that God’s intentions could change. Boyd sidesteps the more abstruse theological debates surrounding this issue in favor of a patient, but not pedantic, exposition of a “motif of future openness” in biblical narrative and prophecy. These biblical texts repeatedly portray God as changing plans in response to human decisions, viewing future events as contingent and even being disappointed at how events turn out. Boyd clearly believes the debate over open theism has gotten off to an unfortunate start, as disagreements about the “settledness” of the future have unnecessarily been interpreted as challenges to God’s omniscience or sovereignty. This convincing, clear book promises to raise the caliber of argument in the controversy.

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God At War

God At War

In this bold and compelling work, Gregory Boyd undertakes to reframe the central issues of Christian theodicy. By Boyd's estimate, theologians still draw too heavily on Augustine's response to the problem of evil, attributing pain and suffering to the mysterious "good" purposes of God.

Accordingly, modern Christians are inclined not to expect evil and so are baffled but resigned when it occurs. New Testament writers, on the other hand, were inclined to expect evil and fight against it. Modern Christians attempt to intellectually understand evil, whereas New Testament writers grappled with overcoming evil.

Through a close and sophisticated reading of both Old and New Testaments, Boyd argues that Satan has been in an age-long (but not eternal) battle against God, and that this conflict "is a major dimension of the ultimate canvas against which everything within the biblical narrative, from creation to the eschaton, is to be painted and therefore understood."

No less edifying than it is provocative, God at War will reward the careful attention of scholars, pastors, students and educated laypersons alike.

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Cross Vision – How the Crucifixion of Jesus Makes Sense of Old Testament Violence

Cross Vision – How the Crucifixion of Jesus Makes Sense of Old Testament Violence

Author:
Genre: Bible Study

Renowned pastor-theologian Gregory A. Boyd tackles the Bible’s biggest dilemma.

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Oneness Pentecostals and the Trinity

Oneness Pentecostals and the Trinity

What's special about Oneness Pentecostals?

In this penetrating analysis of Oneness theology and practice, Gregory Boyd reveals the experience of four years of personal involvement in a Oneness church.

Although Oneness Pentecostals' belief in Christ's deity establishes some common ground with other Christians, their aggressive denial of the Trinity has nonetheless fostered their indisputably sub-Christian ideas about God's character, about salvation, and about Christian living.

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