Category: MennoNerds Podcasts

BGWG 13: Kinky Curly Theological Collective

Ebony and Steve return for an episode of Black Gal, White Guy where they talk about Ebony’s recent work with the Kinky Curly Theological Collective. Topics today include:

Ebony’s recommendations: Black Panther (2018) and A Hidden Wholeness by Parker Palmer (0:54)
Steve’s recommendations: I Am Not Your Negro (2016) and A Time for Burning (1967) (3:21)
An update from Steve on the Village of Hope (6:27)
Introducing the Kinky Curly Theological Collective and why it is necessary (9:19)
Creating a context where women and people of color can safely speak up (18:51)
What about unity when only some voices are speaking in KCTC? (27:08)
The technology behind KCTC: face-to-face meetings in Minnesota (34:34)

http://media.blubrry.com/mennonerds_audio/p/podcasts.mennonerds.com/BGWG13-KinkyCurlyTheologicalCollective.mp3Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS

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Interview: Benjamin Corey, Unafraid

Fellow MennoNerd Benjamin Corey comes on the podcast to talk with Steve about his life, his work, and his newest book Unafraid. A description of the book via HarperCollins says this:

The creator of the popular Formerly Fundie blog on Patheos explains how the “American Christianity” we are currently taught is actually a fear-saturated distortion of biblical faith.
Benjamin L. Corey thought he was suffering a crisis of faith, but it turned out to be a spiritual awakening.
Corey became aware that the constant fear of hell and judgment that defined his Christian faith was out of sync with the idea that God acts from love, and promises to deliver us from fear. In the wake of this realization came newfound insights—from reading the Bible to re-examining American life and the church’s role in the wider world. Corey learned that what he had been taught was a distorted version of Christianity that was not only untrue but caused real spiritual harm.
He also discovered that he wasn’t alone. Many Christians are yearning to distinguish between the Christianity that has become a rigid American civil religion and the authentic Christian faith embodied in Jesus. As he recounts his own spiritual journey, Corey offers a powerful and inspiring message of hope for every Christian increasingly frustrated with the church today. Do not be discouraged, he assures them. You do not need to give up your faith; you can rediscover the reality of a vibrant Christianity that delivers us from fear and inspires and guides us all today.

http://media.blubrry.com/mennonerds_audio/p/podcasts.mennonerds.com/Interview-BenjaminCorey--Unafraid.mp3Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS

BGWG 12: Villages

Ebony and Steve return to discuss the houseless crisis in Portland, Oregon. Topics include:

Steve’s recommendation: Faith in the Face of Empire by Mitri Raheb (1:10)
Ebony’s recommendation: Rethinking Incarceration by Dominique Gilliard, a fellow MennoNerd (3:56)
Introducing the Portland houseless crisis (5:37)
Next step for Steve’s ministry and for Portland: establishing villages (12:02)
The idea of a village and how it helps (17:21)
How to keep these villages from being torn down by government officials or residents who are antagonistic to the houseless population (19:44)
What else can do for this cause (23:43)

If you want to connect with Steve about this work, email stevekimes@aol.com. If you have questions or comments for Ebony and Steve about the show, email bgwg@mennonerds.com.
http://media.blubrry.com/mennonerds_audio/p/podcasts.mennonerds.com/BGWG12-Villages.mp3Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS

Podcast: Does God Punish Children for Sins of Their Parents?

Greg considers Exodus 34:6-7.

Send Questions To:
Dan: @thatdankent
Email: askgregboyd@gmail.com
Twitter: @reKnewOrg

http://traffic.libsyn.com/askgregboyd/Episode_0270.mp3

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Syndicated from Greg Boyd – ReKnew

Podcast: Is It Important to Live Near Your Small Group?

Greg on living life together.

Send Questions To:
Dan: @thatdankent
Email: askgregboyd@gmail.com
Twitter: @reKnewOrg

http://traffic.libsyn.com/askgregboyd/Episode_0271.mp3

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Podcast: Does God Actively Discipline Those He Loves?

Greg on God’s role in suffering.

Send Questions To:
Dan: @thatdankent
Email: askgregboyd@gmail.com
Twitter: @reKnewOrg

http://traffic.libsyn.com/askgregboyd/Episode_0272.mp3

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Podcast: What is Heresy?

Greg defines ‘Heresy’ and looks at why it is often viewed as a ‘mean-y’ word.

Send Questions To:
Dan: @thatdankent
Email: askgregboyd@gmail.com
Twitter: @reKnewOrg

http://traffic.libsyn.com/askgregboyd/Episode_0262.mp3

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BGWG 11: Political Parties

Ebony and Steve return with a new episode of Black Gal, White Guy in which they discuss political parties. Sub-topics covered in this episode include:

Ebony’s recommendation: Kindred by Octavia Butler (0:59)
Steve’s recommendation: Faces at the Bottom of the Well by Derrick Bell (3:39)
Doug Jones winning the Alabama Senate seat (9:50)
Black women carrying Jones to victory (12:30)
Steve is still cynical about American politics (15:57)
The flaws of a two-party system (24:59)
Churches promoting political partisanship is a problem, but Christians still need to be politically active (29:54)

Questions or comments for Ebony and Steve? Email bgwg@mennonerds.com.
http://media.blubrry.com/mennonerds_audio/p/podcasts.mennonerds.com/BGWG11-PoliticalParties.mp3Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS

Interview: Rachel Halder, Sacred, Sexy, and Whole

Rachel Halder joins the podcast to discuss healthy sexuality in general and her book Sacred, Sexy, and Whole in particular. Some topics include:

Introducing Rachel and her history studying sexuality (0:54)
What purity culture means and some of its implications (6:30)
The extent to which purity culture comes out of a long history vs being a new construction (10:42)
Consequences of purity culture (13:45)
Advice for people who are dealing with the harm of purity culture, including the value of masturbation as a way to learn about yourself (18:10)
Resources to help people exploring these questions (22:01)
What’s in the book (25:07)
General responses to the book (28:53)
Trauma that results from purity culture and generational passing down of purity culture (31:42)
Rachel’s relationship with her Mennonite history (35:54)
Neuroscience and sexuality (39:22)
What’s next for Rachel and her work (41:45)
Vision for the Church (43:48)

http://media.blubrry.com/mennonerds_audio/p/podcasts.mennonerds.com/Interview-RachelHalder--SacredSexyAndWhole.mp3Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS

What About the Harsh Words of Paul? A Response to Paul Copan (#4)

This post is my fourth response to a talk given by Paul Copan at the Evangelical Theological Society in November in which he raised a number of objections to Crucifixion of the Warrior God. A major part of Copan’s critique centered on my claim that the love of God that is revealed on the cross, and the love we are called to walk in, is altogether non-violent (or, as Copan prefers, “non-coercive”). One of the arguments he uses to make this point is that Paul sometimes used harsh words of opponents that don’t seem to comport with my cross-centered understanding of love. Paul referred to certain opponents as “dogs” (Phil 3:2). He wished that those who taught that Gentiles must be circumcised would “castrate themselves” (Gal 5:12). And he declared a curse upon anyone who preached a message different from his own (Gal 1:8–9).

I have to grant that these examples indicate that Paul occasionally used language that conflicts with my cross-centered understanding of love. But rather than allowing Paul’s language to qualify our understanding of love, think we should instead conclude that Paul was a fallible human being who didn’t always live up to the Gospel he preached.

I simply do not see how calling a group of people “dogs” is consistent with Jesus’s teaching that we are never to apply slanderous labels to people (Matt 5:22) or with Paul’s own instruction to avoid using demeaning language for others (e.g., Eph 4:29, 31; 5:4; Col 3:8). Nor can I see how Paul’s insulting language is consistent with his own instruction to bless people and to never curse them (Rom 12:14), to never return evil with evil but to instead return evil with good (Rom 12:17; cf. 1 Cor 4:13), and to always treat enemies with loving kindness (Rom 12:19–21). And I certainly do not see how Paul’s insulting language is consistent with his teaching that followers of Jesus are to do “everything in love” (1 Cor 16:14, emphasis added)—an instruction that surely includes referencing theological opponents. When we consider that the early church defined the love that God is and that we are to imitate by pointing us to the cross (I Jn 3:16; cf. Eph 5:1-2), the unloving nature of Paul’s name-calling becomes all the more glaring.

Conceding this point simply means we must accept that Paul was not perfect. And this should not surprise us since Paul, to his credit, openly acknowledges this fact (Phil 3:12-13). Nor should it surprise us that God accommodated Paul’s imperfections when he “breathed” his word through him. This should be no more problematic then the fact that God accommodated Paul’s faulty memory when he “breathed” through him (I Cor 1:14-15).

Not only this, but since God “breathed” his definitive revelation through Christ as he bore the sin of the world, why should anyone suspect that Scripture, which is “breathed” for the ultimate purpose of pointing us to this definitive revelation, would be totally devoid of sin? The cross makes it clear that God has no problem accommodating sin in the process of “breathing” revelations of himself.

Yet, while Paul’s “old self” occasionally comes through in his writings, there is nothing in his inspired teachings that qualifies the unconditional, self-sacrificial, non-violent, enemy-embracing nature of God’s love that was fully revealed on the cross. I thus don’t consider Copan’s use of Paul against my Cruciform Thesis to constitute a particularly strong objection to it.
Photo by stucklo6an on Visualhunt.com / CC BY-NC-ND
The post What About the Harsh Words of Paul? A Response to Paul Copan (#4) appeared first on Greg Boyd - ReKnew.
Syndicated from Greg Boyd – ReKnew

Podcast: How is Jesus Both God and Human?

Greg discusses the incarnation from the perspective of “God as Human” rather than “God and Human.”

Send Questions To:
Dan: @thatdankent
Email: askgregboyd@gmail.com
Twitter: @reKnewOrg

http://traffic.libsyn.com/askgregboyd/Episode_0252.mp3

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BGWG 10: Jesus and Social Justice

Ebony and Steve discuss the importance of social justice within Christianity, particularly focusing on Steve’s story.

Steve’s recommendation of the week (1:37)
Ebony’s recommendation of the week (3:57)
Steve’s conversion experience(s) and how he came to see social justice as central to faith (9:09)
Steve doesn’t recommend that everybody tries to do what he does, but every church/every Christian much actively care about the poor and other outcasts (32:19)
Jesus was political (38:23)

Questions for Ebony and Steve? Email bgwg@mennonerds.com
http://media.blubrry.com/mennonerds_audio/p/podcasts.mennonerds.com/BGWG10-JesusandSocialJustice.mp3Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS

BGWG 9: Mission

Ebony and Steve discuss the topic of mission, and how that important calling often has been tied up and confused with Eurocentric/US-centric colonialism. Topics include:

Ebony’s recommendation: the Kinky Curly Theological Collective (1:20)
Steve’s recommendation: The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel van der Kolk M.D. (4:58)
Steve and Ebony’s history with missions (11:42)
The connection between mission and colonialism (15:47)
Examples of American syncretism into Christianity (19:20)
The need for humility in cultures where you don’t know as well as they do, but they still look to you as the American expert (22:44)

Questions or comments for Ebony and Steve? Email bgwg@mennonerds.com.
http://media.blubrry.com/mennonerds_audio/p/podcasts.mennonerds.com/BGWG9-Mission.mp3Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS

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