“When the time came for their purification according to the law of Moses, they brought him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord (as it is written in the law of the Lord, “Every firstborn male shall be designated as holy to the Lord”), and they offered a sacrifice according to what is stated in the law of the Lord, “a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons.” (Luke 2:22 – 24)

I started to write on this passage several days ago but I was becoming I’ll from the side effects of radiation and just couldn’t focus and think what to say. Some days later I am starting to recover and feel more myself. However, I am not at my computer keyboard but still in the hospital and am pecking this out on my iPad tablet. It took some thinking and logistics to get to this point of copying and pasting the text and then doing a hunt and peck to write with a pen stylus. So please forgive any spelling and grammar errors. The human spirit will not be subdued or stopped by adversity or challenge.

But enough of me. Let’s look to Mary and Joseph, and infant Jesus who, according to customs, are journeying to Jerusalem. It is probably a journey many young couples made, but for Mary and Joseph it was of special significance because of who Jesus was destined to become. There were also people already in place for this event. Consider that beloved reader, that it was fore ordained that at this day and time those who would inform and influence this young couple are in place and waiting to play their part.

Now there was a man in Jerusalem whose name was Simeon; this man was righteous and devout, looking forward to the consolation of Israel, and the Holy Spirit rested on him. It had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he would not see death before he had seen the Lord’s Messiah. Guided by the Spirit, Simeon came into the temple; and when the parents brought in the child Jesus, to do for him what was customary under the law, Simeon took him in his arms and praised God, saying,”Master, now you are dismissing your servant in peace, according to your word; for my eyes have seen your salvation, which you have prepared in the presence of all peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles and for glory to your people Israel.” (Verses 25 – 32)

It is hard for me, beloved reader, to separate out the posts/commentaries on scripture and what is going in my own life. It is the lens through which I understand how the scripture impacts me. You also, beloved reader, bring your life circumstances to the understanding and discernment of scripture.

Have you brought something or someone to the attention of the Divine? Are you seeking prayer or guidance in your life or on behalf of someone else? Does it seem like the waiting goes on forever? Consider how long the Jewish people had to wait for the Messiah. But then consider how long we have been waiting for the return of the Divine. As long or perhaps longer than the Jewish people, who once were the Hebrews and then the Israelites/Judahites, waited. Jesus came at the proper time, just as Mary and Joseph came to the temple at the proper time, and Simeon came at the proper time.

“And the child’s father and mother were amazed at what was being said about him. Then Simeon blessed them and said to his mother Mary, “This child is destined for the falling and the rising of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be opposed so that the inner thoughts of many will be revealed–and a sword will pierce your own soul too.” (Verses 32 – 35)

It also happens in the course of things that what we receive after waiting is not what we expected. It may not fulfill our expectations the way we thought it would. Not long enough or strong enough; or not gentle and mild enough. Like Goldilocks in the Three Bears, what we search and wait for it not “just right.” And it hurts when our expectations are not meet and fulfilled. The Jews expected a Messiah that would be like the king that the Israelites sought. A king that would rule on/from earth and bring victory to the Jewish people. But Jesus was not that type of king. It is a sign of faith, beloved reader, to wait and not be held to any one outcome.

“There was also a prophet, Anna the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher. She was of a great age, having lived with her husband seven years after her marriage, then as a widow to the age of eighty-four. She never left the temple but worshiped there with fasting and prayer night and day. At that moment she came, and began to praise God and to speak about the child to all who were looking for the redemption of Jerusalem.” (Verses 36 – 38)

We are expected to go about our Christian lives, doing what it correct and good, living out an authentic Christian life no matter what befalls us.

“When they had finished everything required by the law of the Lord, they returned to Galilee, to their own town of Nazareth. The child grew and became strong, filled with wisdom; and the favor of God was upon him.” (Verses 39 – 40)

In the midst of the day I wrote this post, I was released from the hospital and returned home. I was glad to do so. But very quickly it became apparent that I would be plunged back into the daily tasks of home life. My almost two day of away time was, despite the ill health, a good reprieve. But as so many reprieves go, just when it gets to be therapeutic it comes to an end. I was deemed well enough to go home.

I thought of just commenting on the passage from the Gospel. But being a celebration day I wanted it to resonate a little more.

See, I am sending my messenger to prepare the way before me, and the Lord whom you seek will suddenly come to his temple. The messenger of the covenant in whom you delight–indeed, he is coming, says the LORD of hosts. But who can endure the day of his coming, and who can stand when he appears? For he is like a refiner’s fire and like fullers’ soap; he will sit as a refiner and purifier of silver, and he will purify the descendants of Levi and refine them like gold and silver, until they present offerings to the LORD in righteousness. Then the offering of Judah and Jerusalem will be pleasing to the LORD as in the days of old and as in former years.” (Malachi 3:1-4)

However, beloved reader, I am leaving it to you to discern for yourself how my post title may apply to this passage as well. Think of what the Messiah was supposed to be like according the called and chosen people of God during Malachi’s time. Think of how the life Jesus prescribes for us winnows out those who cannot commit to such a life. And think of how we must live from now until the Divine comes again to winnow out the believers who have held firm. Selah!